How To Spell Mario

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Michael Fassbender

How To Spell Mario

Video games have a way of embedding iconic sound effects into our memories. The simple “ga-ling!” of the Nintendo coin or Mario’s three-note warp-pipe descent can evoke powerful nostalgia. However, when it comes to describing these sounds, we often lack the vocabulary to do so accurately. It might be interesting to attempt to write out phonetic recreations of some of gaming’s most famous sound effects to see what they would look like on the page.

Mario’s Jump

Undoubtedly, the most iconic video game jumping sound effect of all time, Mario’s leap is elastically charged. Its arc is as important as its phonetics—it starts low, then crests up and down, in a perfect sonic representation of the famed plumber’s impossibly springy leap.

Metal Gear Exclamation Point

The sound of dread, the sound of failure: nothing quite sends shocks through the system like the sound of a guard being alerted in Metal Gear. The effect is a bit rounder than expected, with a clear “v” sound.

Halo Shield Recharge

This sound effect is a two-parter—the first, a notification of extreme vulnerability: “dee-dee-dee-dee-dee,” followed, after an excruciating wait, by the lengthy “oooooooommmm” as a Spartan’s shield recharges.

Super Mario Bros. Warp Pipe

The warp-pipe sound from Super Mario Bros. is tricky to spell out due to its warbly quality. However, it can be represented as a series of “garlp”s.

Belmont’s Castlevania Whip

The famous whip of the Belmont clan may not read like a whip, but it sounds like one. It opts for cutting sibilance over explosive consonance.

Doom Demon

The roar emitted by the silly pink demons in Doom as they go in for the attack is very guttural.

Sonic’s Jump

Unlike Mario’s jump, Sonic the Hedgehog’s jumping sound effect is a good deal more ostentatious. It’s a long, rolling “Bloooiiii!” as he spins through the air.

Sonic’s Coin-Grab

Grabbing rings in Sonic the Hedgehog tends to overlap and duplicate as multiple rings are grabbed in quick succession. The sound effect of grabbing a single ring tends to overlap and duplicate as multiple rings are grabbed in quick succession.

Zelda Rupee

The sound effect of finding rupees in The Legend of Zelda games is quite common. It is heard when killing a monster, breaking a rock, or simply pruning some hedges.

Achievement Unlocked

The “achievement unlocked” notification is so tinnily, cutely satisfying that it is practically a reward unto itself.

FAQs

How do you spell Mario’s iconic jump sound effect?

To spell Mario’s iconic jump sound effect, you can use the phonetic representation “elastically charged, starting low, then cresting up and down.”

What is the phonetic representation of Metal Gear’s exclamation point sound?

The phonetic representation of Metal Gear’s exclamation point sound includes a bit rounder effect with a clear “v” sound.

How can the warp-pipe sound from Super Mario Bros. be spelled out?

The warp-pipe sound from Super Mario Bros. can be represented as a series of “garlp”s.

What is the sound effect of grabbing rings in Sonic the Hedgehog?

The sound effect of grabbing rings in Sonic the Hedgehog tends to overlap and duplicate as multiple rings are grabbed in quick succession.

What is the iconic sound effect of finding rupees in The Legend of Zelda games?

The iconic sound effect of finding rupees in The Legend of Zelda games is quite common and is heard when killing a monster, breaking a rock, or simply pruning some hedges.

How would you describe the “achievement unlocked” notification sound?

The “achievement unlocked” notification sound is tinnily, cutely satisfying, practically a reward unto itself.

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